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April 09 2015

aren
12:26
0804 3b25 390
Breath anatomy
Tags: biology anigif

March 30 2015

aren
08:27
4593 7873 390
sleeping positions
Reposted fromoopsiak oopsiak

March 07 2015

aren
06:58
Broccoli
Tags: biology anigif
Reposted fromgruetze gruetze vianibbler nibbler

February 10 2015

11:12
6127 e850 390

sassy-girl-fitness:

teamheichou:

yourstrulyjustin:

fitmitch:

girlgrowingsmall:

gym-doll:

stunnerdd:

Never really realized how much fat was inbetween organs too!

This is why people shouldn’t get discouraged when they first start losing weight. Its not gonna come off your tummy and thighs first its gonna come off between the organs.. where it shouldn’t be!

These visualizations are some of my biggest short-term motivators. They help me remember that a lot of the physical changes that occur from healthy habits are in parts we can’t see.

I couldn’t agree with Risa more. It’s easy to get discouraged when you feel like your hard work isn’t yielding any results, but things like this help me to remember that progress isn’t always visible. But that certainly doesn’t mean it isn’t occurring.

Visualization of how fat accumulates.

some helpful inspiration for my bros who are working hard to get fit…keep at it guys!

Oh wow.

🎀

Tags: sports biology
Reposted fromxiulric xiulric viakarli2 karli2

February 09 2015

aren
08:46
Universe No. 25
from John B Calhoun: "Death Squared. The Explosive Growth and Demise of a Mouse Population", Proc R Soc Med. 1973 Jan; 66(1 Pt 2): 80–88.

Sci-Fi Dystopias We've Actually Created:
Universe No. 25

by Robert Brockway (Cracked, June 13, 2012)

Let's set the scene: A brilliant, eccentric scientist devotes his life to refining the perfect society. After two dozen iterations, he finally hits it: Universe 25. It is a huge, painstakingly designed megastructure with prebuilt living spaces for all of its occupants. There are no threats, no danger, no disease, and everything is provided for you. There's unlimited free, clean water and healthy food, the temperature is always 68 degrees Fahrenheit -- hell, it even cleans itself every couple of weeks. And sure, maybe it's a little disconcerting that the walls go so high and there are no exits, but really, do you need them? Where do you have to go anymore? All you have to do in this place is live happily with yourself, your wife and three other couples. It's paradise.

If it sounds too good to be true, it's not: John B. Calhoun actually built it, all the way back in 1972. The results? In just under two years, despite having every possible amenity provided for happy living, the occupants of Universe 25 turned on each other. The collapse was apocalyptic: There was rampant cannibalism and sexual deviancy, savage violence became the norm and, most damning of all, a killer apathy took root like a plague. The few occupants of Universe 25 who were not murderballing each other to death simply stopped caring about anything -- survival, life, morality -- they all but laid down and died.

But it wasn't that big a deal; they were just a bunch of stupid mice, after all.

Universe 25 was a 101-square-inch tank, carefully engineered to safely and comfortably hold over 1,000 mice. Everything was provided for a little mouse heaven, but it's like Rodent Sartre said: Hell is other mice.

There were only four breeding pairs at first, but then nature took over. When Universe 25's population reached 600 mice -- not even close to capacity -- growth began to slow. At a staggering 2,200 mice, twice the maximum comfortable occupancy, growth of Universe 25 stopped altogether. But it was too late; the environment could not regulate. Living with such overcrowding had ruined the mice psychologically. Without normal designated tasks like protection and food gathering, the mice became psychotically, randomly violent. Or else they turned into something worse: One of the ominously dubbed "Beautiful Ones." The Beautiful Ones didn't want sex, they didn't want to fight, they didn't want anything -- the world started destroying itself around them and all they did was eat, sleep and groom themselves. With the only potential mates being rage virus psychos or impotent, navel-gazing egomaniacs, all breeding stopped, and Universe 25 collapsed completely.

But it was inevitable, really. The clue was in the name: What do you think happened to Universes 1 to 24? Tiny mouse apocalypses were such old hat to Calhoun that he'd even devised an algorithm for it. This is it:

Mortality, bodily death = the second death

Drastic reduction of mortality
= death of the second death
= death squared
= (death)2

(Death)2 leads to dissolution of social organization
= death of the establishment

Death of the establishment leads to spiritual death
= loss of capacity to engage in behaviors essential to species survival
= the first death

Therefore:
(Death)2 = the first death


Jesus, dude. When you're constructing the algorithm for the perfect society and you start factoring the "drastic reduction of morality" and carrying the "death of the establishment," maybe it's time to check your back for some kind of purple cape: You might have finally crossed that fine line between mathematician and supervillain. But what did that morbid algorithm end up proving, anyway? That mice suck at building societies? You don't need math to prove that shit, Calhoun; just open up the cages at the pet store and see how long it takes them to start running the register. What's that? They're not doing it all? They're just pooping? Everywhere? Right, because they're friggin' mice, man.

But Calhoun wasn't just playing Vengeful Mouse God for kicks; his intended point was to demonstrate the long-term effects of serious overcrowding, even in a society with absolutely no shortage of resources.

You know, kind of like ours ...

Listen, whether you buy the validity of his results or not, the fact is this: Calhoun built tiny little universes all his life, just to see where ours was headed. And when he'd gazed in that crystal ball long enough, he pulled his eyes away, rubbed at the bridge of his nose and carefully jotted down the words "death squared" in his little notebook.
Reposted fromArchimedes Archimedes viascience science

February 08 2015

09:08

Backs of Fish

Tags: biology fun
Reposted frombwana bwana viakissalonecomplex kissalonecomplex

February 05 2015

08:21
9835 b96f 390

polarbear1986:

heysawbones:

"Data has no impact on those who fear vaccines as the fear is irrational. It’s an old issue. This cartoon (is) from (the) ’30s."

From here.

It is both hilarious and sad that this has come around again. 

December 22 2014

aren
13:49
If humans had evolved from different creatures
Tags: biology
Reposted fromfabs3 fabs3 viadarksideofthemoon darksideofthemoon

December 20 2014

aren
08:24
07:37
7394 30fa 390

femputations:

eyqu:

laughing-treees:

so glad I found this
it’s
evolution
follow one cell from the middle outwards

Holy shit

When it gets to the end it exhales a soul

Reposted fromgrevling grevling viasatyra satyra

December 16 2014

aren
21:44

December 12 2014

aren
18:26
7297 0a48
devolution
Reposted frombecurious becurious viavertheer vertheer
18:22
4815 1929 390

starborn-vagaboo:

pyrositshere:

mastercreart:

leg refences

Reblogging this not only for artists but also for people who write werewolf (and other animal transformation) fiction.  If a human turned into a wolf, their knee joints would not reverse— what some fic writers mistake for the knee is actually the ankle.  A wolf’s hind feet are relatively long, and they are always walking in way roughly analogous to human “tip-toeing.”

For anyone curious, the artist is Marshall Vandruff and he has a free webinar up on Imaginarium as well as dvds from Gnomon Workshop!

Tags: biology animal
Reposted frombwana bwana viavertheer vertheer

December 03 2014

aren
11:50

Gross changes in reconstructions of historic land cover/use for Europe between 1900 and 2010
by Richard Fuchs, Martin Herold, et al.
Global Change Biology. doi: 10.1111/gcb.12714

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/enhanced/doi/10.1111/gcb.12714/

Abstract
Historic land-cover/use change is important for studies on climate change, soil carbon, and biodiversity assessments. Available reconstructions focus on the net area difference between two time steps (net changes) instead of accounting for all area gains and losses (gross changes). This leads to a serious underestimation of land-cover/use dynamics with impacts on the biogeochemical and environmental assessments based on these reconstructions. In this study, we quantified to what extent land-cover/use reconstructions underestimate land-cover/use changes in Europe for the 1900–2010 period by accounting for net changes only. We empirically analyzed available historic land-change data, quantified their uncertainty, corrected for spatial-temporal effects and identified underlying processes causing differences between gross and net changes. Gross changes varied for different land classes (largest for forest and grassland) and led to two to four times the amount of net changes. We applied the empirical results of gross change quantities in a spatially explicit reconstruction of historic land change to reconstruct gross changes for the EU27 plus Switzerland at 1 km spatial resolution between 1950 and 2010. In addition, the reconstruction was extended back to 1900 to explore the effects of accounting for gross changes on longer time scales. We created a land-change reconstruction that only accounted for net changes for comparison. Our two model outputs were compared with five commonly used global reconstructions for the same period and area. In our reconstruction, gross changes led in total to a 56% area change (ca. 0.5% yr−1) between 1900 and 2010 and cover twice the area of net changes. All global reconstructions used for comparison estimated fewer changes than our gross change reconstruction. Main land-change processes were cropland/grassland dynamics and afforestation, and also deforestation and urbanization.
Reposted fromArchimedes Archimedes viascience science

November 20 2014

13:40
1909 3f47 390

vashiane:

Natural Eye Color Chart

November 15 2014

09:02
6039 0514

camwyn:

educational-gifs:

How an ant walks. This is called a tripod gait and is common in hexapods (6 legs).

This may be of interest to some of the artists/animators/science fiction types following my blog.

Tags: biology anigif
Reposted frombwana bwana vianibbler nibbler

November 12 2014

aren
10:46
4884 743c
MRI of a banana
Tags: biology anigif

September 09 2014

07:24
7624 e8e5

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

They see me walkin' they hatin'

Reposted frombwana bwana viasashthesplash sashthesplash

August 25 2014

06:28
8487 0892

sixpenceee:

HOW THE MOKIN CHILDREN ARE ABLE TO SEE WITH AMAZING CLARITY UNDERWATER

The Mokin are a group in Thailand that are nomadic and have a sea-based culture. 

In the sea there is less light, so usually one’s iris will dilate. But the Mokin have an adaption where instead of dilating, they constrict as much as possible. 

This allows them to see with much better clarity. Recent studies suggest that any child can quickly learn this trick. It exemplifies how well our brain adapts to our environment. 

SOURCE 

You may also like: SWIMMING BABIES

August 19 2014

aren
18:06
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