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April 29 2014

aren
10:58

April 26 2014

aren
12:26
Reposted fromgruetze gruetze viasplinterpie splinterpie

April 04 2014

aren
19:46
aren
14:26

February 07 2014

aren
12:53

January 29 2014

06:01
1986 0510 390

thegrimmgrimm:

aburritoofsadness:

iamswagg007:

kgrossniklaus:

gentlemanbones:

I fucking hate game night with the engineering graduates

Don’t get me started on Poker Night with the math students. 

Monopoly with business majors is the fucking worst

Scrabble with english majors is a nightmare.

i can’t believe those weren’t puns

January 24 2014

aren
13:44
Daylight fireworks
Reposted fromvolldost volldost viaTodeswalza Todeswalza

January 22 2014

aren
11:18
Gyroscopically Stabilized pool table on a cruise ship
Reposted fromvolldost volldost viatatonka tatonka

January 18 2014

aren
17:37

January 17 2014

aren
08:20

January 15 2014

aren
10:31

joshbyard:

Google’s Machine Learning Algorithms Outpacing Engineers’ Ability to Understand How they Work

“Google no longer understands how its “deep learning” decision-making computer systems have made themselves so good at recognizing things in photos.

What stunned [Google Software Engineer] Quoc V. Le is that the software has learned to pick out features in things like paper shredders that people can’t easily spot – you’ve seen one shredder, you’ve seen them all, practically. But not so for Google’s monster.

Many of Quoc’s pals had trouble identifying paper shredders when he showed them pictures of the machines, he said. The computer system has a greater success rate, and he isn’t quite sure how he could write a program to do this.

Google researchers can no longer explain exactly how the system has learned to spot certain objects, because the programming appears to think independently from its creators, and its complex cognitive processes are inscrutable. "

(via The Register ht algopop)

Reposted fromsimplex simplex viaRK RK

January 09 2014

14:34

The Berkeley Tricorder is now Open Source!

multiple tricorders

[Reza Bauna] has just released the designs for his Berkeley Tricorder for the public to use. He’s been designing it since 2007 as his thesis work for his PhD, and since he’s done now (Congrats!), he decided to let it grow by making it open source!

We covered it almost 7 years ago now when it was in its first prototype form, and it has come a long way since then. The latest version features an electromyogram (EMG), an electrocardiograph (ECG), a bioimpedance spectrometer, a pulse oximeter, an accelerometer, and all the data is recorded to a micro SD card or sent via bluetooth to a tablet or smart phone for data visualization.

He’s released it in hopes that other researchers can utilize the hardware in their own research, hopefully springing up a community of people interested in non-invasive health monitoring. With any luck, the development of the Berkeley Tricorder will continue, and maybe some day, can truly live up to its name!

Unfortunately there’s no new video showing off the latest iteration, but we’ve attached the original video after the break, which gives a good narrative on the device by [Reza] himself.


Filed under: Medical hacks
Tags: engineering
Reposted fromhackaday hackaday viaaperture aperture

January 07 2014

22:16

3D Printed Replacement Parts

Our shop has a few Black & Decker drills. They’re not contractor grade tools by any means. I was using one the other day for a project, and as I was walking back to the tool crib to put stuff away I was idly clicking the drive direction switch back and forth, as one does with a drill. I heard a snapping noise and the button now moved freely, no longer engaging the electrical switch responsible for direction reversal. Bummer. I figured I’d pop it open and see if I could repair it.

B&D drill

The drill in question

DSC_5621

The factory part that broke. Note the distressed, white plastic at the bottom center.

The issue was a small plastic pin that engaged a switch with a matching cutout. Not a very complex mechanism. I drew the part up in Sketchup:

drill-fix

 

I skipped the nicely radiused leading edge, but this part is otherwise dimensionally similar to the factory piece. My initial attempts to use an entirely 3d-printed part failed, as the ~3mm pin was just not large enough to get a sturdy printed feature. I decided to drill it out and use a #2 screw to replace the pin. This one should outlast the rest of the drill.

DSC_5629

DSC_5632

At this point you might be wondering why I didn’t do that with the original part to begin with, and that’s valid. My only answer is, “Because I didn’t think of it.”

DSC_5634

The part’s installed, and the drill is back in the tool crib.

It’s a simple result, but it’s the sort of thing I love about 3D printing.

-Derek

 

Reposted fromhackerspaces hackerspaces

January 03 2014

08:28
8545 e86b 390

4gifs:

Controlling sand with sound waves

Reposted frombochinohito bochinohito viaawezone awezone

December 25 2013

aren
16:06
Play fullscreen
▶ "Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy" on the Glass Armonica - YouTube
aren
00:23
4897 180a
Reposted frompterodactor3000 pterodactor3000

December 24 2013

aren
08:57

Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." | Betrand Russell

"Beauty of Mathematics" by Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux 

Reposted fromMoonTide MoonTide viaryumajin ryumajin

December 23 2013

aren
11:18
Purifying water with electrocoagulation
Reposted fromscience science
aren
08:20
SpaceTop, CHI 2013 (PREVIEW)

Reposted fromscience science

December 18 2013

aren
23:30
We had a good run
Reposted fromscience science viacheatha cheatha
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