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May 07 2015

16:57
0832 4cc4 390

she-could-combust:

rightnowbb:

brutereason:

These are from a wonderful book called The Art Of Comforting. Check it out and learn how to be better at supporting people going through difficult things.

OH MY GOD THIS IS AMAZING I NEED THIS SKILL SO MUCH

(not that i would say the stuff on the left. but i’d probably say something useless)

helpful list. word choice makes such a difference.

Reposted fromWeasleyGeek WeasleyGeek viareplugged replugged

April 23 2015

aren
13:43
2276 9199 390
Types of intelligence
* naturalist
* musical
* logical-mathematical
* existential
* interpersonal
* bodily-kinesthetic
* linguistic
* intra-personal
* spatial
Tags: psychology
Reposted fromoopsiak oopsiak viasatyra satyra

April 12 2015

06:46
0816 a997 390
Introvert Extrovert
Tags: psychology art
Reposted fromkeeptheharmony keeptheharmony viakaerion kaerion

April 10 2015

aren
08:27

March 30 2015

aren
08:27
4593 7873 390
sleeping positions
Reposted fromoopsiak oopsiak

February 15 2015

12:15

jainz:

frozun:

i think a lot of people forget that you can actually still come across as confident and have social anxiety

image

image

Reposted frompassivelyhere passivelyhere viahairinmy hairinmy

November 01 2014

aren
15:05
7699 7f82 390
Reposted fromhagis hagis viatimecode timecode

May 23 2014

10:01
8003 eb04 390

sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

Tags: psychology
Reposted fromPhoenixbird Phoenixbird

February 07 2014

aren
20:32

September 29 2013

aren
15:49
Monstrous Discrepancies
Reposted bymarbearrinkalordminxankinavgp

August 29 2013

aren
10:04

Just thinking about science triggers moral behavior : Nature News & Comment

Public opinion towards science has made headlines over the past several years for a variety of reasons — mostly negative. High profile cases of academic dishonesty and disputes over funding have left many questioning the integrity and societal value of basic science, while accusations of politically motivated research fly from left and right. There is little doubt that science is value-laden. Allegiances to theories and ideologies can skew the kinds of hypotheses tested and the methods used to test them. These, however, are errors in the application of the method, not the method itself. In other words, it’s possible that public opinion towards science more generally might be relatively unaffected by the misdeeds and biases of individual scientists. In fact, given the undeniable benefits scientific progress yielded, associations with the process of scientific inquiry may be quite positive.

March 13 2012

aren
16:49

February 09 2012

aren
06:20

December 11 2011

aren
14:19
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Reposted fromnikotyna nikotyna viagordin gordin
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