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April 06 2015

aren
08:47
wandering spark lightning
Tags: science anigif
Reposted fromlokrund2015 lokrund2015 viaSam90 Sam90

March 29 2015

06:58
0219 1f82 390

pizzaotter:

chibi-masshuu:

fencehopping:

Giant balloon popping in slow motion.

Blood bending is real.

This is the coolest thing ever.

Tags: science anigif
Reposted fromlifu lifu viarepostedfrom repostedfrom

March 19 2015

aren
23:04
Flight videos deconstructed
Reposted fromvith vith viaoopsiak oopsiak

February 09 2015

aren
23:43
aren
08:46
Universe No. 25
from John B Calhoun: "Death Squared. The Explosive Growth and Demise of a Mouse Population", Proc R Soc Med. 1973 Jan; 66(1 Pt 2): 80–88.

Sci-Fi Dystopias We've Actually Created:
Universe No. 25

by Robert Brockway (Cracked, June 13, 2012)

Let's set the scene: A brilliant, eccentric scientist devotes his life to refining the perfect society. After two dozen iterations, he finally hits it: Universe 25. It is a huge, painstakingly designed megastructure with prebuilt living spaces for all of its occupants. There are no threats, no danger, no disease, and everything is provided for you. There's unlimited free, clean water and healthy food, the temperature is always 68 degrees Fahrenheit -- hell, it even cleans itself every couple of weeks. And sure, maybe it's a little disconcerting that the walls go so high and there are no exits, but really, do you need them? Where do you have to go anymore? All you have to do in this place is live happily with yourself, your wife and three other couples. It's paradise.

If it sounds too good to be true, it's not: John B. Calhoun actually built it, all the way back in 1972. The results? In just under two years, despite having every possible amenity provided for happy living, the occupants of Universe 25 turned on each other. The collapse was apocalyptic: There was rampant cannibalism and sexual deviancy, savage violence became the norm and, most damning of all, a killer apathy took root like a plague. The few occupants of Universe 25 who were not murderballing each other to death simply stopped caring about anything -- survival, life, morality -- they all but laid down and died.

But it wasn't that big a deal; they were just a bunch of stupid mice, after all.

Universe 25 was a 101-square-inch tank, carefully engineered to safely and comfortably hold over 1,000 mice. Everything was provided for a little mouse heaven, but it's like Rodent Sartre said: Hell is other mice.

There were only four breeding pairs at first, but then nature took over. When Universe 25's population reached 600 mice -- not even close to capacity -- growth began to slow. At a staggering 2,200 mice, twice the maximum comfortable occupancy, growth of Universe 25 stopped altogether. But it was too late; the environment could not regulate. Living with such overcrowding had ruined the mice psychologically. Without normal designated tasks like protection and food gathering, the mice became psychotically, randomly violent. Or else they turned into something worse: One of the ominously dubbed "Beautiful Ones." The Beautiful Ones didn't want sex, they didn't want to fight, they didn't want anything -- the world started destroying itself around them and all they did was eat, sleep and groom themselves. With the only potential mates being rage virus psychos or impotent, navel-gazing egomaniacs, all breeding stopped, and Universe 25 collapsed completely.

But it was inevitable, really. The clue was in the name: What do you think happened to Universes 1 to 24? Tiny mouse apocalypses were such old hat to Calhoun that he'd even devised an algorithm for it. This is it:

Mortality, bodily death = the second death

Drastic reduction of mortality
= death of the second death
= death squared
= (death)2

(Death)2 leads to dissolution of social organization
= death of the establishment

Death of the establishment leads to spiritual death
= loss of capacity to engage in behaviors essential to species survival
= the first death

Therefore:
(Death)2 = the first death


Jesus, dude. When you're constructing the algorithm for the perfect society and you start factoring the "drastic reduction of morality" and carrying the "death of the establishment," maybe it's time to check your back for some kind of purple cape: You might have finally crossed that fine line between mathematician and supervillain. But what did that morbid algorithm end up proving, anyway? That mice suck at building societies? You don't need math to prove that shit, Calhoun; just open up the cages at the pet store and see how long it takes them to start running the register. What's that? They're not doing it all? They're just pooping? Everywhere? Right, because they're friggin' mice, man.

But Calhoun wasn't just playing Vengeful Mouse God for kicks; his intended point was to demonstrate the long-term effects of serious overcrowding, even in a society with absolutely no shortage of resources.

You know, kind of like ours ...

Listen, whether you buy the validity of his results or not, the fact is this: Calhoun built tiny little universes all his life, just to see where ours was headed. And when he'd gazed in that crystal ball long enough, he pulled his eyes away, rubbed at the bridge of his nose and carefully jotted down the words "death squared" in his little notebook.
Reposted fromArchimedes Archimedes viascience science

February 08 2015

aren
09:05
Reposted fromscience science

January 02 2015

aren
21:20
Tags: science anigif
Reposted fromSpecies5618 Species5618 viaShingomur Shingomur

December 20 2014

aren
13:08

What makes a language important on a global scale? Is it the oldest? The one spoken by the most people? What about the one that has the greatest ability to reach other people by being translated? A multidisciplinary research team has examined the languages of the world and categorized them on how widely certain forms of media are translated into other languages. César Hidalgo of MIT led the research, and the paper was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Source: IFLscience

aren
08:24
07:37
7394 30fa 390

femputations:

eyqu:

laughing-treees:

so glad I found this
it’s
evolution
follow one cell from the middle outwards

Holy shit

When it gets to the end it exhales a soul

Reposted fromgrevling grevling viasatyra satyra

December 18 2014

aren
11:15

December 17 2014

aren
17:39

December 09 2014

aren
11:49
Planetary Society's Core Values
Reposted fromeglerion eglerion

December 01 2014

09:37
0206 9292 390

errantcohle:

notverygeneric:

mautlin:

did-you-kno:

Where there are wolves, there are ravens. Ravens follow wolves around a lot, mostly because they just seem to like them. They aren’t known to follow other predators and they prefer to eat with the wolves instead of alone. Source

ravens get easy food out of the relationship, and wolves get protection; the ravens fly above and alert the wolves to danger. ravens and wolves are also known to play with each other, esp. chasing games. they are both intelligent and playful animals who genuinely enjoy each other’s company. they also understand many of the other’s vocalizations.

i love ravens

I need a story about about a wolf pack leader with a kingly personality and a smart ass raven being best bros. that would be the coolest shit!

is this ronan and adam or

Tags: animal science
Reposted fromleviloveseren leviloveseren viaschaaf schaaf

November 29 2014

aren
20:41

Publishing: The peer-review scam
When a handful of authors were caught reviewing their own papers, it exposed weaknesses in modern publishing systems. Editors are trying to plug the holes.

by Cat Ferguson, Adam Marcus & Ivan Oransky
(from http://retractionwatch.com/)

Nature 515, 480–482 (27 November 2014) doi:10.1038/515480a

http://www.nature.com/polopoly_fs/1.16400!/menu/main/topColumns/topLeftColumn/pdf/515480a.pdf
Reposted fromArchimedes Archimedes viascience science

October 29 2014

aren
18:15

Algal virus found in humans, slows brain activity


(AAAS, Oct. 2014) The virus, called ATCV-1, showed up in human brain tissue several years ago, but at the time researchers could not be sure whether it had entered the tissue before or after the people died. Then, it showed up again in a survey of microbes and viruses in the throats of people with psychiatric disease. Pediatric infectious disease expert Robert Yolken from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, and his colleagues were trying to see if pathogens play a role in these conditions. At first, they didn't know what ATCV-1 was, but a database search revealed its identity as a virus that typically infects a species of green algae found in lakes and rivers.

The researchers wanted to find out if the virus was in healthy people as well as sick people. They checked for it in 92 healthy people participating in a study of cognitive function and found it in 43% of them. What’s more, those infected with the virus performed 10% worse than uninfected people on tests requiring visual processing. They were slower in drawing a line connecting a sequence of numbers randomly placed on a page, for example. And they seemed to have shorter attention spans, the researchers report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2014/10/23/1418895111
Tags: science
Reposted fromArchimedes Archimedes viascience science

September 09 2014

08:29
7803 89af 390

boesed:

laughinghieroglyphic:

Whoa. The MLA has officially devised a standard format to cite tweets in an academic paper. Sign of the times.

ebooks, Horse. (horse_ebooks). “Leg Butt” 18 Nov 2011, 12:38 PM. Tweet.

Reposted fromgreggles greggles viagordin gordin
07:24
7624 e8e5

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

They see me walkin' they hatin'

Reposted frombwana bwana viasashthesplash sashthesplash

August 15 2014

aren
05:21
aren
05:21
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